Camfil

 

Excelsiorlaan 67-69
B-1930 Zaventem

Phone:  +32 2 705 80 70
Email: info.be@camfil.com

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Laboratory

CLEAN AIR SOLUTIONS FOR LABORATORY ENVIRONMENTS

Camfil has been working together with leading manufacturers of laminar air flow (LAF) bio-safe cabinets for many years. We know the technical requirements of this industry. MEGALAM, for example, is the best HEPA filter for this industry.

Strict requirements have to be observed for the laminarity flow in safety cabinets. Some OEM customers even demand 0.45 m/s with tolerances according to the applicable standards.

Thanks to our CMS (Controlled Media Spacing) folding technology and the optional ‘laminator’ that can be added to the filter package during production, we can easily meet these requirements.

STANDARDS FOR LABORATORIES

1. EN 12469 standard for safety cabinets

Safety cabinets can be divided into three classes:

Class I: Safety cabinet with an opening on the front via which the operator can perform work in the cabinets and that is designed in such a way that the employee is protected. The escape of contaminated air particles occurring in the cabinet is managed by an inward air flow via the opening on the front and by filtration of the exhaust air.

Class II: Safety cabinet with an opening on the front via which the operator can perform work in the cabinets and that is designed in such a way that the employee is protected. The risk of product and cross-contamination is low and the escape of contaminated air particles occurring in the cabinet is managed by a well-filtered inward air flow and by filtration of the exhaust air. Note: This is generally achieved with a downward (laminar) flow in one direction into the cabinet and an air curtain on the front of the opening.

Class III: Safety cabinet in which the working area is completely closed and the operator is separated from the work by a physical barrier (such as gloves that are fastened mechanically to the cabinet). Filtered air is constantly supplied to the cabinet and the exhaust air is treated to prevent the escape of microorganisms.

2. WHO Biosafety Manual

This manual distinguishes between risk levels from 1 to 4 with the aim of preventing exposure to harmful microorganisms, where risk level 1 represents the lowest risk and risk level 4 the highest risk. Levels 1 and 2 are not regarded as containment laboratories, while levels 3 and 4 are. The section ‘Code of Practice’ deals with access, personal protection, procedures, laboratory working areas and biosafety management.

The section ‘Design and Facilities’ covers the design features. The section ‘Laboratory equipment’ presents the basic equipment for biosafety laboratories. The section ‘Health and Medical Surveillance’ describes the surveillance of the health of laboratory personnel coming into contact with microorganisms with different risk levels. These are followed by sections on training, waste handling and safety with respect to chemical substances, fire, electricity and radiation.

Excerpts from the manual:

The containment laboratory with Biosafety Level 3 is designed and provided for work with Risk Group 3 microorganisms and with large volumes or high concentrations of Risk Group 2 microorganisms that pose an increased risk of aerosol spread. Biosafety Level 3 containment requires the strengthening of the operational and safety programmes over and above those for basic laboratories with Biosafety Levels 1 and 2 (1)

  1. The building ventilation system must be so constructed that air from the containment laboratory with Biosafety Level 3 is not recirculated to other areas within the building. Air may be high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtered, reconditioned and recirculated within that laboratory. When exhaust air from the laboratory (other than from biological safety cabinets) is discharged to the outside of the building, it must be dispersed away from occupied buildings and air intakes. It is recommended that this air is discharged via HEPA high-efficiency filters. (1)
  2. Biological safety cabinets should be sited away from walking areas and out of crosscurrents from doors and ventilation systems (see chapter 7). (1)
  3. The exhaust air from Class I or Class II biological safety cabinets (see chapter 7), which will have been passed through HEPA filters, must be discharged in such a way as to avoid interference with the air balance of the cabinet or the building exhaust system. All HEPA filters must be installed in a manner that permits gaseous decontamination and testing. (1)

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